Agile/Dev Ops

Agile and DevOps have emerged as the standard for enabling a quicker transformation, even as traditional software cycles struggle to keep up with the pace of change.  Technalink has a long history of employing and evolving Agile as well as DevOps practices, even for our own use. We understand what it takes to create a culture of agile within our customer organizations.

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Data Services

Technalink Data Services offers a range of services that leverage the enormous amounts of data derived global infrastructure utility platforms. From innovative data provisioning and data management support to robust cyber security solutions, Technalink Data Services provides clients with enhanced control and flexibility to access various types of data and established services to mitigate risk, enhance efficiency and lower cost.

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Financial Management

Technalink is devoted to providing professional cost- effective solutions, Technalink offers a wide variety of financial, administrative, and IT services to the federal government. We support our partners through implementation, support, and maintenance of commercial off­ the ­shelf (COTS) and custom financial management. By providing the effective support, our client partners benefit from proven, hands-­on solutions.

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Technalink Comittment

Technalink's commitment to cultivating relationships with industry leaders gives you access to opportunities that you cannot find on your own.

For over a decade, Technalink has been working to support and advance the careers of IT professionals. We have evolved through changes in technology and the job market to build key relationships and track a proven record of success. With a full range of specialty areas, including Agile, Development & Operations, Data Services, and Financial Management, Technalink has the experience to give you the advantage in many different industries.

Technalink News Room


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What Managers Should Know About Postpartum Depression

Francesco Carta fotografo/Getty Images Going back to work after having a baby is tricky stuff. After all, the new parent is simply not the same person they were before. This personal struggle, combined with a misguided workplace view of what a parent was actually doing on leave (no, they were not just lounging about and cuddling with their baby) add to a cultural disconnect. While the complexities of early days at home with a baby are often overwhelming, most workplaces simply treat any leave as time “off,” like it’s an extended vacation. In reality, a new parent is actively climbing a steep learning curve: mastering a whole new set of skills, tackling challenges that are not only foreign but also highly personal, and making sense of a new emotional and physical normal. The birth parent has to cope with physical healin....
Managing Parental Leave (Yours or Someone Else’s)

From the Women at Work podcast: Listen and subscribe to our podcast via Apple Podcasts | Google Podcasts | RSS Download the Discussion Guide for this episode Download this podcast Having a baby is exciting — and exhausting. Figuring out how to take parental leave, or manage someone who’s doing it, can add an extra wrinkle. No matter how long you’ll be away from work, there’s preparation to be done: talking to your boss, making sure colleagues can cover your projects, handling unexpected needs and feelings. With the help of our guest expert, Daisy Wademan Dowling, we talk about how to effectively plan for your parental leave or the leave of someone you manage. And through the story of a lucky woman whose organization offers 12 months of paid leave, we explore what our lives might be like if we ha....
Why Companies Are Creating Their Own Coworking Spaces

UpperCut Images/Getty Images Nestled in the Silicon Sentier district of Paris, the Villa Bonne Nouvelle (“House of Good News”), or VBN, initially appears to be another new coworking space. But what sets it apart is that only half of its 60 occupants are freelancers. The remainder work for Orange (née French Telecom), which launched VBN in 2014 to teach its programmers and engineers how to work with and learn from people outside of the company. The experiment succeeded: Teams temporarily stationed there worked better and faster than colleagues elsewhere, and they reported greater satisfaction and engagement (along with bouts of depression upon returning to the office). Even the HR executives managing the space were surprised by their bonhomie. More villas are now in the works. Orange describes its approach as “corp....
Lifestyle Brands Are Building Hotels Now. Here’s Why That Actually Makes Sense.

Barry Winiker/Getty Images These days, it seems, every brand wants to be a “lifestyle brand.” Peddling burritos? “Our ultimate marketing mission is to make Chipotle not just a food brand but a purpose-driven lifestyle brand,” the company’s new head of marketing said. Selling sweets? Godiva wants “to be seen as a lifestyle brand by leveraging [our] culinary experience to expand beyond chocolates,” a statement read. Shipping meal-preparation kits to families? Blue Apron, its new CEO argued, sees itself as “a strong consumer lifestyle brand that [plays]…a more meaningful role in our customers’ lives.” All three examples appeared in a recent article in the New York Times, which both chronicled and raised a skeptical eyebrow about the commitment of so many brands, in some pret....
A 6-Part Tool for Ranking and Assessing Risks

David Crockett/Getty Images One of the most overused expressions thrown around by wannabe “Wall Street Rambos” is business is war. But sometimes war tactics really can help in business. Among these tactics is CARVER, a system for assessing and ranking threats and opportunities. Developed during World War II, CARVER (then one letter shorter and known as CARVE) was originally used by analysts to determine where bomber pilots could most effectively drop their munitions on enemy targets. It can be both offensive and defensive, meaning it can be used for identifying your competitors’ weaknesses and for internal auditing. In addition, many security experts consider it the definitive assessment tool for protecting critical assets. In fact, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security has recommended it as a preferred assessment m....
Innovation Should Be a Top Priority for Boards. So Why Isn’t It?

Jason Jaroslav Cook Creative/Getty Images Corporate directors and executives alike recognize that today’s pace of change continues to accelerate and that firms need to innovate to stay ahead. But are boards doing enough to support innovation, as they should? We conducted a survey of over 5,000 board members from around the world to find out. We found that, overall, innovation does not rank as a top strategic challenge for the majority of boards. Although directors in certain industries are more aware of the threat of disruption, the widespread lack of board-level engagement in innovation processes could be a major blind spot and a potential liability. Setting Priorities We found that concerns about innovation fall behind other issues for most directors. Fewer than one-third (30%) of respondents to our survey see innovation as one ....
People Who Graduate During Recessions Earn Less Money — but They’re Happier

adamkaz/Getty Images When the graduating classes of 2009, 2010, and 2011 hit the job market, their employment prospects were depressingly bleak. Unemployment rates were at historic highs and job openings were scarce. Nine months after graduation, only 56% of the class of 2010 had found a job. Many of those who did find work held jobs that were temporary, lacked benefits, or did not require a college degree. These early career experiences appear to have lasting negative consequences for later career success. For instance, people who graduate in recessions earn less money than their counterparts who graduated in more-favorable economic times, even decades later. They also tend to work for smaller, less-prestigious, and lower-paying firms. Similar patterns emerge among people who reach the pinnacle of corporate life: CEOs. Recession gradua....
How to Help Your Team Manage Grunt Work

Brett Hemmings/Getty Images In So I Married an Axe Murderer, a wacky 1990’s parody, a police officer named Tony confides to his captain, “I’m having doubts about being a cop. You know, it’s not like how it is on TV. All I do all day is fill out forms and paperwork.” Tony thought his job would be more thrilling than it has turned out to be. Tony is not alone. Every job contains some unglamorous grunt work. I am a great proponent of the joys of work. But not every part of every job is a joy. While we all want to find a level of meaning and purpose in our work, often, some fraction of our time has to be spent doing tasks that have no intrinsic meaning and serve no deeper purpose than helping to keep the workplace trains running. This can be especially tough for early-career professionals to accept, especially ....
Research: 83% of Executives Say They Encourage Curiosity. Just 52% of Employees Agree.

Danas Jurgelevicius/Getty Images Curiosity is experiencing a “Gold Rush” moment. Books, university classes, and research are popularizing the power of curiosity. Not surprisingly, organizations are increasingly, explicitly looking for curious employees. Consider these job descriptions pulled from several job listing websites: “If you have a passion and curiosity for what is possible and enjoy people, we invite you to join us on this mission” (posting for a retail sales position); “We are counting on you to bring a genuine curiosity about how consumers search for information” (posting for a data analyst role); “Because our world is continuously evolving, you’ll need to possess curiosity and a love of learning” (posting for a digital content writer role). Given the importance of curi....
Reality TV Doesn’t Have To Be Dumb - SPONSOR CONTENT FROM QATAR FOUNDATION

Stars of Science, a reality TV “edutainment” competition for the Arab world, is set to celebrate its 10th anniversary, owing to its success as a show that rewards innovation above all else.   Within less than 20 years, the phenomenon commonly referred to as “reality TV” has fundamentally altered television viewing habits the world over. Though the genre of unscripted entertainment is as old as television itself, it was not until the early 2000s that viewers became enraptured by the sight of survivalists competing on desert islands, budding pop stars taking the stage, and business hopefuls getting fired by a future US president. In the Arab world, reality TV is a similar cultural phenomenon, with nation-specific and regional competitions seeking to discover singing and dancing talents. But amid the array of op....
Resignations

Are you looking to quit your job? In this episode of HBR’s advice podcast, Dear HBR:, cohosts Alison Beard and Dan McGinn answer your questions with the help of David Burkus, a management professor at Oral Roberts University. They talk through what to do when you want to call out a toxic employee in your resignation letter, reject a counteroffer, or resign without burning bridges. Download this podcast Listen to more episodes and find out how to subscribe on the Dear HBR: page. Email your questions about your workplace dilemmas to Dan and Alison at dearhbr@hbr.org. From Alison and Dan’s reading list for this episode: HBR: What to Do After You Tell Your Boss You’re Leaving by Carolyn O’Hara — “Don’t sully your hard-won reputation by slacking off in your final few weeks. Go out on a high note by mak....
4 Ways Busy People Sabotage Themselves

ImageGap/Getty Images You’ve left an important task undone for weeks. It’s hanging over you, causing daily anxiety. And yet instead of actually doing it, you do a hundred other tasks instead. Or you’ve been feeling guilty about not replying to an email, even though replying would only take 10 minutes. Or maybe the last time you needed stamps, you went to the post office to buy a single stamp because you couldn’t find the 100-pack you purchased a few months ago. You know it’s around… somewhere. But you just don’t have the time to clean your desk to find it. These self-sabotaging patterns maintain a cycle of always having too much to do (or at least feeling like that’s the case). If you’re chronically tapped out of the immense amount of mental energy required for planning, decision mak....
Why CEOs Should Share Their Long-Term Plans with Investors

Fanatic Studio/Getty Images Many people have suggested moving away from quarterly earnings reporting as a way to reduce short-termism. But such a change would probably not change how resources are allocated or businesses operate. Rather than requiring less short-term information, we believe the key to combating short-termism is to encourage companies to share more information about their long-term plans. When asked why companies don’t talk more about the long term, CEOs often complain about the short-term orientation of investors. Similarly, investors complain that companies don’t disclose enough long-term information for them to work with. This conundrum is finally being tackled by the Strategic Investor Initiative of CECP, a CEO-level organization where one of us works. CECP has created a framework for CEOs to present the ....
How to Retain and Engage Your B Players

Peter Dazeley/Getty Images We’ve heard for decades that we should only hire A players, and should even try to cut non-A players from our teams. But not only do the criteria for being an A player vary significantly by company, it’s unrealistic to think you can work only with A players. Further, as demonstrated by Google’s Aristotle project, a study of what makes teams effective, this preference for A players ignores the deep value that the people you may think of as B players actually provide. As I’ve seen in companies of all sizes and industries, stars often struggle to adapt to the culture, and may not collaborate well with colleagues. B players, on the other hand, are often less concerned about their personal trajectories, and are more likely to go above and beyond in order to support customers, colleagues, and....
Research: The Digitization of Banks Disproportionately Hurts Women Entrepreneurs

Veronica Grech/Getty Images As banks rush to digitize their operations, many have found that closing their local branches can help maintain a high return on an otherwise pricy transformation. European banks, for example, closed over 9,000 branches in 2016, which represents a 4.6% reduction in a single year. According to our calculations, using data from the Swedish Bankers’ Association, a full one-quarter of bank branches in Sweden have shuttered over the past four years. In the United States, the total number of bank branches has dropped by 8.2% since 2013, and shrank by more than 1,700 in 2017 alone. This rapid transformation is also occurring in Asian banks, where services are being digitalized, bank functions are being centralized, and local bank branches are closing down. Although banks consider this digitalization to be one ....
You Have to Stop Canceling and Rescheduling Things. Really.

HIDEKI KUWAJIMA/Getty Images A friend recently returned to his parked car to find it had been sideswiped. Now, every time he calls the insurance company, he hears a message saying: “Can’t take your call right now. Leave a message. All calls will be returned by the end of the day.” So far, he’s called over a dozen times; his calls have been returned only twice. Why would an insurance adjuster have a voicemail message assuring callers that “all calls will be returned by the end of the day” and then return only 20% of the calls it committed to returning? Probably for the same reasons most of us promise “to write back to your email on Monday” but don’t, or promise “to send out that memo by Friday” but don’t. Why do any of us say we will do things and then fail to do the....
Use Your Everyday Privilege to Help Others

SAMUEL ZELLER/UNSPLASH I often forget I am straight.  I just don’t think about it much.  When asked what I did this weekend, or when setting family photos on my desk at work, I have no reason to wonder if what I say will make someone uncomfortable, or lead to a “joke” at my expense, or cause a co-worker to suddenly think I am attracted to them.  Our culture is set up for straight people like me to be ourselves with very little thought. But for some gay colleagues, a simple question about the weekend or a decision of how to decorate the workspace carries significant stress—how to act, who to trust, what to share.  A recent study found that 46% of LGBTQ employees are closeted in the workplace, for reasons ranging from fear of losing their job to being stereotyped.  Unlike me, a non-straight....
Big Data and Machine Learning Won’t Save Us from Another Financial Crisis

Eric Frommelt/Getty Images Ten years on from the financial crisis, stock markets are regularly reaching new highs and volatility levels new lows. The financial industry has enthusiastically and profitably embraced big data and computational algorithms, emboldened by the many triumphs of machine learning. However, it is imperative we question the confidence placed in the new generation of quantitative models, innovations which could, as William Dudley warned, “lead to excess and put the [financial] system at risk.” Eighty years ago, John Maynard Keynes introduced the concept of irreducible uncertainty, distinguishing between events one can reasonably calculate probabilities for, such as the spin of a roulette wheel, and those which remain inherently unknown, such as war in ten years’ time. Today, we face the risk that i....
A 4-Step Plan to Make Your Q&A More Audience-Friendly

Dirk Anschutz/Getty Images The Q&A or fireside chat has become a popular format at events like conferences and employee town-halls, replacing more-formal presentations and panels. The one-on-one format can create a more conversational, interesting, and intimate experience, and has the added benefit that the CEO or luminary being interviewed theoretically doesn’t have to prepare as much. Despite how effective interviews can be in theory, however, they are often difficult to execute in practice. As a result, audience members are often left feeling disengaged and unsatisfied while guests struggle to inform and engage in a way that resonates. In our Essentials of Strategic Communication at Stanford’s Graduate School of Business, we’ve begun including advice on how to handle this format effectively to help our students ....
How Companies Get Creativity Right (and Wrong)

Beth Comstock, the first female vice chair at General Electric, thinks companies large and small often approach innovation the wrong way. They either try to throw money at the problem before it has a clear market, misallocate resources, or don’t get buy in from senior leaders to enact real change. Comstock spent many years at GE – under both Jack Welsh’s and Jeffrey Immelt’s leadership – before leaving the company late last year. She’s the author of the book Imagine It Forward: Courage, Creativity, and the Power of Change. Download this podcast
Disruptive Startups Get Funding More Easily, but Less of It

Gina Pricope/Getty Images In the start-up world, the disruptor is the cool kid on the block, the one who’ll change the world — or at least the products you’ll buy and how you buy them. She takes on the grown-ups in suits and shows us all how dumb they are. Customers love her because she makes them feel like rebels (with a cause), suppliers love her because she makes them look smart, and — most importantly — investors love her because she makes them feel they’re putting money into tomorrow’s big player. That, at least, is what the hype around disruption would have you believe. A new product or technology sells better to all stakeholders if people can be persuaded that it will disrupt the status quo. But does the evidence bear out this belief?  Specifically, does presentin....
How to Get Better at Reading People from Different Cultures

Paula Daniëlse/Getty Images Body language varies significantly across cultures. What is considered rude or foolish in a Nordic country may be welcomed as warm and friendly in an African one. What a Canadian businessperson would perceive as arrogant, an American executive may see as healthy confidence. But what remains consistent across all known cultures are microexpressions. These brief, involuntary flashes of facial expression reveal our true feelings about another person or situation. Photos courtesy of the Center For Body Language. People might try to hide or obscure them in different ways informed by culture, but to a practiced reader the true emotions are always visible. Consider the contrast in expressiveness between Filipino and Japanese people. In the Philippines, showing emotion — both positive and negative ̵....
The Best-Performing Emerging Economies Emphasize Competition

Max Mumby/Indigo/Getty Images Development economists over the ages have puzzled about why some emerging economies perform much better than others over the long term. We have been looking at the same issue in our latest research, and find one element that others haven’t tended to focus on: the often intense competitive dynamics that can be found in the best performing emerging economies—a competitive mindset that has spawned a new generation of productive and battle-hardened companies that aspire to be global champions. That finding may seem counter-intuitive: don’t many emerging economies nurture and shield their national champions from competition? The short answer we find from our research is: No. In fact, by some measures, the best emerging-market firms are more competitive than firms in advanced economies including....
Protecting Company Culture Means Having Rules for Email

Simon McGill/Getty Images A new study out of Virginia Tech University confirms something that just about every knowledge worker already knows: Dealing with after-hours emails produces anxiety that is damaging not only to the worker, but to their family. One particularly striking finding of this study is that it’s not just the amount of time taken up by reading and answering emails after work that’s stressing out employees (and their partners). In fact, what’s creating more anxiety is just the expectation that an employee will be available for work outside the office. Take this example: A manager does not expect employees to return her emails during off-hours or while they’re on vacation, but she never explicitly says this. Instead, she assumes they “just know,” and therefore thinks there is no harm in....
How Customers Come to Think of a Product as an Extension of Themselves

KAZUHIRO NOGI/Getty Images Businesses are constantly vying to capture the attention of potential customers. It’s not easy to do. People are inundated with different brands as they stroll through the streets, scan through their social media newsfeeds, and binge television. The average American is exposed to more than 4,000 ads every day. A simple concept can help businesses cut through the noise. It’s called psychological ownership. That’s when consumers feel so invested in a product that it becomes an extension of themselves. Companies that encourage psychological ownership can entice customers to buy more products, at higher prices, and even to willingly promote those products among their friends. But if businesses disrespect this feeling, sales can suffer. To build psychological ownership, companies must use at least....