Agile/Dev Ops

Agile and DevOps have emerged as the standard for enabling a quicker transformation, even as traditional software cycles struggle to keep up with the pace of change.  Technalink has a long history of employing and evolving Agile as well as DevOps practices, even for our own use. We understand what it takes to create a culture of agile within our customer organizations.

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Data Services

Technalink Data Services offers a range of services that leverage the enormous amounts of data derived global infrastructure utility platforms. From innovative data provisioning and data management support to robust cyber security solutions, Technalink Data Services provides clients with enhanced control and flexibility to access various types of data and established services to mitigate risk, enhance efficiency and lower cost.

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Financial Management

Technalink is devoted to providing professional cost- effective solutions, Technalink offers a wide variety of financial, administrative, and IT services to the federal government. We support our partners through implementation, support, and maintenance of commercial off­ the ­shelf (COTS) and custom financial management. By providing the effective support, our client partners benefit from proven, hands-­on solutions.

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Technalink Comittment

Technalink's commitment to cultivating relationships with industry leaders gives you access to opportunities that you cannot find on your own.

For over a decade, Technalink has been working to support and advance the careers of IT professionals. We have evolved through changes in technology and the job market to build key relationships and track a proven record of success. With a full range of specialty areas, including Agile, Development & Operations, Data Services, and Financial Management, Technalink has the experience to give you the advantage in many different industries.

Technalink News Room


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How to Be More Productive Without Burning Out

Moment/Getty Images Like many of my classmates, shortly after college, I joined the ranks of a top strategy and management consulting firm. I knew I was signing up for long hours, but the reality of that didn’t really sink until a few months in, when I asked for a vacation day to go to a friend’s wedding. My request was granted, sort of. My wife handled the long drive to the wedding, while I spent my “day off” in the passenger’s seat working furiously on my laptop, with occasional stops at cafes to recharge my computer and send emails via the free wifi. This pace continued for months – even on national holidays, I holed up in my apartment to work — and I began to wonder how long I could continue. Unfortunately, this story of impending burnout is not unusual. In fact, as recently as 2012, a Gal....
What Workers and Companies Should Know About the Republican Tax Bills

Daniel Haskett/Getty Images The House and Senate have passed somewhat different versions of major legislation to restructure the federal income tax. A House-Senate conference committee still needs to reconcile the two bills, with the goal of finishing before Christmas. Both bills would significantly overhaul the corporate income tax, increase the federal budget deficit, and disproportionately benefit upper-income taxpayers. And the bills include many provisions that are poorly understood and may have unintended consequences. The legislation would dramatically change how both companies and individuals pay taxes. Here are the broad strokes of the bills, as of this writing, some of which are more positive than others. Corporate Tax Reform The bills would reduce the federal statutory corporate tax rate to 20% (which translates to about 25....
Better Cybersecurity Starts with Fixing Your Employees’ Bad Habits

Chris Gilleard/Getty Images Cybercrime is here to stay, and it’s costing American firms a lot of money. The average annualized cost of cybercrime for global companies has increased nearly 62% since 2013, from $7.2 million to $11.7 million. And these are just the average direct costs. Target, which experienced a massive data breach in 2013, reported that the total cost of the breach exceeded $200 million. Verizon, which recently purchased Yahoo, may have snagged a $350 million discount because of three large-scale Yahoo data breaches that occurred in recent years. Given these costs, what can companies do? Governments and industry are doing what seems like the obvious thing to do — spending billions of dollars to develop and implement new technologies designed to stop the bad guys before they can get through the front door. ....
Why the WTO Should Constrain the Power of China’s State-Owned Enterprises

chuttersnap/unsplash The Trump Administration has a chance to start working with 164 other countries to create “rules of the road” to stop China building national champions with government funding. Such state-owned enterprises or state-supported industries (SOEs) — think steel, aluminum and solar panels — have flooded global markets, depressed prices, and literally shut down hundreds of U.S. solar-panel startups. Trade ministers of the World Trade Organization (WTO) will meet December 11-13 in Buenos Aires for their eleventh conference to review progress and set the agenda for global trade negotiations. The United States will ask the 163 other Member nations to begin talks on new “transparency” provisions — targeted at China but applicable to all members — that are intende....
Substitute Doctors Are Becoming More Common. What Do We Know About Their Quality of Care?

William Whitehurst/Getty Images A little-known fact about health care is that hospitals frequently hire substitute doctors – or, as they are called in the profession, locum tenens physicians (from the Latin for “to hold the place, to substitute for”) – to temporarily cover for doctors who are vacationing, sick, attending conferences, or on leave for other reasons. In the United States, which first started using locum tenens in the 1970s, demand for these temporary physicians has quietly exploded over the past 15 years – and the number of U.S. physicians working as locum tenens has risen steadily from an estimated 26,000 physicians in 2002 to 48,000 physicians in 2016, or approximately 5% of the physician workforce. At the same time, there has been concern over whether locum tenens physicians provide ....
How to Talk About Sexual Harassment with Your Coworkers

Jorg Greuel/Getty Images If the topic of sexual harassment hasn’t come up in your office – either on Slack, in conversations over lunch, or by the watercooler — I’d be surprised. With the ongoing #metoo campaign and the almost daily headlines about men accused of harassing their coworkers, this subject is top of mind for many of us. But these conversations are tricky. You may be — understandably — nervous about how to handle the subject if (when) it comes up. So is it better to steer clear altogether? Or can you have a thoughtful, productive discussion? And when you do engage, how do you respond to someone who says something you find insensitive or offensive? To help answer these questions, I turned to two experts and HBR contributors: Holly Weeks, a lecturer at the Harvard Kennedy School and the au....
How to Apply for a New Job After You’ve Been Fired

Klaus Vedfelt/Getty Images After you’ve been fired, getting back into the job market can be difficult. How should your résumé reference the previous position, or should you even include it? What should you say in an interview? And how can you go into the application process feeling positive about your prospects? What the Experts Say Looking for a job is never easy, and it can be even more nerve-wracking after your confidence has been through the wringer. It’s natural to feel slightly paranoid, says John Lees, UK-based career strategist and author of The Success Code. “You have no idea how much information about you and your circumstances is out there beyond what you’re broadcasting,” he says. And you might fret that others will perceive your firing as a stain on your record, says Claudio Fe....
Make Work Meaningful for Your Freelancers, Too

Suparat Malipoom/EyeEm/Getty Images It’s your job as a manager to make work meaningful for the members of your team. But what about the freelancers with whom you work? Have you stopped to consider how they’re finding meaning in their careers? We answered this question by interviewing freelancers in a wide range of industries — from tech to advertising. And what we found in our interviews was an interesting reinforcement of our prior work on employer branding and agile talent. The freelancers’ answers about what made work meaningful for them mapped to these six drivers: Advancement: Moving up, seeking status and responsibility Autonomy: Independence, seeking choice and flexibility Balance: Time for what matters, seeking achievement and enjoyment Service: Social contribution, seeking to make the world a better p....
Aerial Photos Tell a Story About Which Cities Are Embracing Clean Energy

Japan, Kanto Region, Tokyo Prefecture. JTB Photo/UIG/Getty Images Over the course of a couple of weeks, I had the unique pleasure of flying into four of the most populated cities* in the world: Tokyo, Sao Paulo, Mexico City, and New York City. The metropolitan area of each of these mega-cities is home to more than 20 million people. Besides realizing that my carbon footprint for this year would be particularly horrendous, two things occurred to me from my perch in the sky: 1) there are a lot of people out there and 2) you can get a sense of how well a region is embracing clean energy by just looking at rooftops. People are everywhere. It’s obvious, but worth noticing periodically: there are a lot of people on the planet now. Like, a lot. Many of us know this intellectually, but we rarely feel it in our bones or contemplate ....
The Most Common Ways You Could Get Tricked into Compromising Company Data

JakeOlimb/Getty Images While major breaches where millions of records are compromised tend to dominate the news, a much more dangerous and insidious threat goes largely unnoticed — that of the insider. An “accidental insider” is a well-meaning employee who is tricked by adversaries or competitors into revealing passwords or unintentionally installing malicious code onto organizational networks. Alternately, a malicious insider steals data for personal or financial gain with intent to harm the employer. How prevalent is the insider threat problem? According to a study performed by Accenture and HFS Research, “2 out of 3 respondents reported experiencing data theft or corruption from within their organizations.” A study by the Ponemon Institute reveals that 62% percent of end users say they have access to c....
Why the Australian Defence Organization Is Recruiting Cyber Analysts on the Autism Spectrum

Aaron Tilley/Getty Images It seems like every week brings news of yet another major cybersecurity breach. Evidence suggests that the bad guys are getting smarter and more professional. Nowhere is the problem tougher than in national defense, where sophisticated actors, including nation states, engage in cyberwarfare. A big part of the problem: There simply aren’t enough great cyberdefense analysts to go around. The Australian Defence Organization (ADO), which consists of  the Australian Defence Force and the civilian Australian Department  of Defence personnel supporting the ADF, has the same escalating challenge. To help address it, ADO has, with the help of some innovative business firms, leapt to the forefront with a new approach to sourcing cybersecurity talent: “Dandelion programs.”....
How Digital Tools and Behavioral Economics Will Save Retirement

ryccio/Getty Images In my work as a behavioral economist, I’ve thought a lot about how nudges can drive lasting behavior change. In the domain of retirement savings, Nobel laureate Richard Thaler and I devised a program called Save More Tomorrow back in the mid-1990s that used nudges to help people make better decisions about their long-term financial future. That program invites employees to gradually increase their savings rate over time, and it has been a success: according to my latest estimates, it has boosted the savings rates of as many as 15 million Americans. Unfortunately, it took us 20 years to help that many people. The slow pace of this process has led me to become increasingly interested in digital nudging, which seeks to identify online designs that help people make smarter choices. The advantages o....
Shoppers Need a Reason to Go to Your Store — Other Than Buying Stuff

STR/Getty Images The holiday season, which is by far the most important time of year for retailers, highlights the increasingly intense battle between physical stores and online websites. Given the large number of casualties this year — witness the bankruptcy filings of such venerable institutions as Toys ‘R Us, The Limited, H.H. Gregg, Gander Mountain, Payless Shoes, and RadioShack, to name but a few — retailers must finally wake up to the core terrain over which they’re fighting: customers’ time. Online retailers offer consumers time well saved. People can find what they want, when they want it, with incredible ease and convenience, and with the physical good shipped directly to their homes in a matter of days (and increasingly, in large cities, hours). As often as not, they don’t even h....
Too Many Experts Can Hurt Your Innovation Projects

Matthew Dent/Getty Images If you need an appendectomy, call a surgeon. But if you’re seeking a CEO for a surgical device company, an MD may not be your best choice. To be sure, entrepreneurs in highly specialized and technical industries need the knowledge that only users (doctors, lawyers, engineers, and the like) can provide. Doctors understand what other doctors will value in a new product; lawyers know what other lawyers need. But you can have too much of a good thing — including input from such experts. In fact, my colleagues and I have found that innovation thrives when expert users make up about 40% of an invention team. Any less and the company will lose sight of what its customers need; any more and the group will tend to converge on old ideas. Earlier this year, Sruthi Thatchenkery, Michael Christensen, Stef....
Can Index Funds Be a Force for Sustainable Capitalism?

Hiroshi Watanabe/Getty Images The investment industry is changing. Among other things, there is growing demand from both retail and institutional investors to align their capital with better environmental and social outcomes, and more resources going into index fund or quasi-indexing products. These two trends may seem separate—or, some people believe, incompatible—but together I believe they have the power to improve finance’s role in the world. Index funds can be a force for sustainable capitalism. Socially conscious investing is exploding as a practice and at some point I expect it to be indistinguishable as a product or service or category. All investment practices will consider environmental, social, and governance (ESG) metrics because some of those metrics are financially material, meaning decision-useful piec....
How to Improve the Engagement and Retention of Young Hourly Workers

VANDAL Photography/Getty Images What would you do if the majority of your entry-level, hourly workforce was planning to leave in less than a year? More than half of the 1,200 young people working in entry-level jobs we surveyed said that was their plan — and less than a quarter felt highly satisfied with their job. That’s expensive for business. Turnover can cost up to 200% of an employee’s annual salary, depending on the role. In industries like retail, customer service, and hospitality, entry-level turnover alone costs billions of dollars each year, based on voluntary turnover rates and annual replacement costs. Meanwhile, employee disengagement results in higher absenteeism, more accidents, lower business profitability, worse customer service, and a lower share price. To understand how employers can improve e....
The Future Economy Project: Advice from Sustainability Experts

Future Economy Future Thinking A roundtable conversation with our advisers. Learn about the future economy project Mint Images – Art Wolfe/Getty Images Harvard Business Review interviewed the CEOs and other business leaders who signed up to the Future Economy Project, our initiative spotlighting businesses’ sustainability agendas. We then virtually convened the project’s advisers for a roundtable discussion about what they viewed as the major issues raised in the interviews, and their own counsel for executives wishing to create long-term value through a sustainable business agenda. The discussion with Michael Toffel and Rebecca Henderson of Harvard Business School, Tensie Whelan of NYU’s Stern School ....
Productivity Tips for People Who Hate Productivity Tips

“Traditional approaches to staying focused don’t work for me.” “I know what I should do to be more productive, but I just don’t do it.” I hear sentences like these repeatedly from coaching clients. Many have read articles and books — and have even been trained in productivity methods — but still find staying focused to be an uphill battle. Why do people who know a lot about what helps people focus still struggle to focus? Through my work, I’ve identified several reasons, as well as strategies that may help you gain control. Assuming that others’ preferred productivity strategies should work for you can yield frustration and a sense of defeat. A friend or an author may advocate their own approach so enthusiastically that it seems fail-proof if properly implemented. But if you exp....
Biometrics Won’t Solve Our Data-Security Crisis

4×6/Getty Images The history of proving one’s identity with official documentation dates back 600 years to the realm of King Henry V in England. Prior to that, your name and local reputation was pretty much all you needed to prove who you were. The Safe Conducts Act of 1414 created the first documentation for the English to prove themselves as subjects of the king when outside England: Thus, the creation of the first official passport. Surprisingly little has changed since then, at least in the U.S.: Your driver’s license is the default proof of identity for everything from flying domestically to buying a new house. For transactions over the phone or internet, we rely on publicly available information to verify identity (name, address, where you went to high school). If we really want to be secure, we rely on our....
Should You Share Your Feelings During a Work Conflict?

When a disagreement gets heated with a colleague, it’s normal to feel all sorts of emotions: disappointment, anger, frustration. But should you express those emotions? Or try to keep them close to your chest? Will it help if you tell your colleague that they’ve made you mad? Should they know how upset you are? Of course, just because you feel angry, doesn’t mean you have to express it. And the real issue is not whether you reveal your emotions or not. What’s most important is that you have the ability to choose whether or not to share your feelings. This isn’t always easy because when we’re having an argument with someone, too often we feel as if we are in the grip of the emotions and they’re dictating what we say and do, rather than the other way around. Under these circumstances, you’re n....
The Future Economy Project: Q&A with Marne Levine

Future Economy Mission-Driven Sustainability Marne Levine is the COO of Instagram (Facebook, Inc.). Previously, she was the vice president of Global Public Policy at Facebook. The company focuses on building environmentally friendly work sites and data centers and improving access to clean energy for all. This interview has been edited and condensed. Learn about the future economy project J. Kempin/Getty Images Levine talked with HBR about her firm’s sustainability efforts as part of the Future Economy Project, an HBR initiative that shares real-world lessons on sustainability leadership. HBR: Why did you decide to pursue a sustainability agenda? LEVINE: Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg has been very clear from the beginning that bu....
Emailing While You’re on Vacation Is a Quick Way to Ruin Company Culture

fandijki/Getty Images Companies expend untold energy building culture—defining their values, revamping their office space, organizing holiday parties and volunteer outings. And yet many managers don’t seem to realize that while company culture can be really hard to build, it’s incredibly easy to destroy. And you may unknowingly ruin it in just two steps. Step 1: Go on vacation. Step 2: Continue working like you never left. It is common practice for American managers. Our latest research at Project: Time Off shows that just 14% of managers unplug when they’re on vacation. At the most senior levels of leadership, a mere 7% do. The majority check in with work at least once a day. If you’re in this camp, there is a good chance you are thinking about maintaining your own peace of mind either while you’re....
Box’s CEO on Pivoting to the Enterprise Market

Aaron Levie, the CEO of Box, reflects on the cloud storage company’s entry into the enterprise market. He was skeptical about pivoting away from consumers, and it was challenging. But by staying disciplined with the product and deeply understanding market trends, they’ve made the strategic shift from B2C to B2B work. Download this podcast
What the CVS-Aetna Deal Means for the Delivery of U.S. Health Care

Carol Yepes/Getty Images The landscape for the delivery of health care in the United States is changing, but the traditional care-delivery players are not the change agents. The recent announcement of CVS’s $69 billion deal to acquire Aetna brings an insurer together with a large network of primary care providers: CVS has built more than 1,100 Minute Clinic locations inside its pharmacy stores in 33 states and the District of Columbia. Also, Optum a division of UnitedHealth Group, the largest health insurer in America, has quietly amassed a group of medical providers over 20,000 strong, and on December 6, UnitedHealth announced plans to acquire DaVita Medical Group for the $4.9 billion. DaVita operates nearly 300 medical clinics, 35 urgent-care centers, and six outpatient surgery centers in California, Colorado, Florid....